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Joyo XVI Octaver pedal

Joyo XVI Octaver pedal  ·  Source: YouTube/Joyo

Need an octaver pedal that masters the lower and upper octave, but without the additional options of a TC Electronic Sub’n’Up? Take a look at the Joyo XVI, because it can do more than the great POG – and costs less.

Octaves, octaves, octaves.

Octavers like the Joyo XVI do nothing more than shift the tone played up or down an octave. Since the Electro-Harmonix POG, guitarists have had the luxury of no longer having to choose up or down, but to have both combined in one device.

Incidentally, the name XVI (16 in Roman numerals) refers to the two octaves it can span, 8 notes down and 8 notes up. So sixteen in total.

There are lots of octavers out there that can do this, such as the Mooer Tender Octaver II, which was the subject of a court case because it turned out to be a copy of an EHX product. Or there’s the TC Electronic Sub’n’Up, or the KMA Moai Maea, which uses a slightly different approach. But in a crowded marketplace, you need to offer your own take on this effect. It’s a good thing that Joyo have given this some thought and developed their own product, rather than just copying someone else’s circuit.

Joyo XVI Octaver pedal

Joyo XVI Octaver pedal

Joyo XVI

In addition to the controls for Dry, Sub and Upper for the respective octaves, there is another control at hand: Mod. It’s an adjustable modulation that’s off when set all the way to the left. Dialling through to the right adds wobble to the tremolo and chorus. Unfortunately, the Mod knob does not change the modulation speed, but only the depth. A missed opportunity, I think.

Price and market launch

For 89 euros at Thomann*, the Joyo XVI is definitely worth a try. I find the idea of incorporating modulation into an octaver very practical. It is now available from a retailer you trust.

More Information

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by Jef

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