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Danelectro '59X, '59XT, '66T and '66BT

Danelectro '59X, '59XT, '66T and '66BT  ·  Source: Danelectro

Danelectro has just added two new models to its line-up, the ’66T and ’59XT. Predictably heavy on the vintage- inspired vibe, they look quite familiar and should please players looking for some retro chic. 

Danelectro ’66T and ’59XT

These variations of existing guitars have been given a bit of a revamp/makeover, with some nicer hardware that includes Wilkinson trem systems and coil-splittable humbuckers.

The Shorthorn model aka ’59X remains a composite plywood guitar, with nothing else changed apart from the two pickups. In the neck position, it now comes with a high output single coil in the form of a P94 and a lipstick humbucker in the bridge position, which can be split via coil tap.

The ’59XT Is the same model just with the Wilkinson trem system instead of the ‘wrap around bridge’ of the ’59T.

RRP – USD 449 for the ‘59X and USD 499 for the ‘59XT.

Danelectro '59XT Silver

Danelectro ’59XT Silver

Danelectro '59X Red

Danelectro ’59X Red

 

66T and 66BT

These two Mosrite-inspired models, the ’66T and ‘66BT, come with the same Wilkinson trem and pickup combination as the two ’59X models, but this time we have a baritone version as well, denoted by the BT suffix. Construction-wise, they are both ‘semi-hollow’ guitars using a chambered masonite body. Both come with a centre block to keep them rigid.

RRP – USD 749  for the ’66T and USD 799 for the ’66BT

Danelectro '66T

Danelectro ’66T

Danelectro '66BT BlueBurst

Danelectro ’66BT BlueBurst

Vintage looks with modern tweaks

I’m a fan of the looks on these new models. The pricing seems pretty reasonable, but I haven’t had a chance to play any of these yet, of course, and so I can only go on looks and the specs available. I was also a pretty big fan of the ’64 model they released back in 2016, but I think that was priced way too high.

The Wilkinson trem systems are stable though. Granted, they’re not very vintage looking, but definitely robust enough to work well for modern guitar players. All in all, I think these look pretty decent and could be good for players looking for something with the ’60s vibe, but with modern stability.

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by Jef

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