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Joe Bonamassa Lucite Fender Twin-Amp on Instagram

Joe Bonamassa Lucite Fender Twin-Amp on Instagram all lit up!  ·  Source: Instagram/Joe Bonamassa

Joe Bonamassa has just revealed an amp on his Instagram page – and it’s not just any amp. Oh no, this one is a Lucite Fender Twin-Amp! This amp, surely, is all about transparent tone…

Joe Bonamassa Lucite Fender Twin-Amp

Featuring two 12” Celestion JB-85 speakers, this high-powered Fender combo is constructed from Lucite. Which means that it is completely transparent and you can see the insides of the whole amp.

Transparent Twin

Joe Bonamassa already has a few signature Fender amps, the Limited Edition Twin and Dual Professional model. But the new post online tells us this Lucite version is a Twin. So we suspect that this one is based around the Limited Edition’s specification. But unfortunately,  the Instagram page doesn’t reveal any of the juicy details!

Tone is in the fingers?

You can hear the amp in action below, so head over there and take a listen. I’m not sure how much the Lucite affects the amp’s tone. Let’s face it, Joe Bonamassa always sounds like himself, no matter what amp and guitar he is playing through.

Either way, it is a pretty spectacular looking combo and one that will certainly turn heads. My only real worry if I owned an amp made of Lucite is that I would crack it unloading it from our van at gigs!

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by Jef

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Dane
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Jef, I’m really not trying to troll you, but … guess what Lucite is made of? Yep, oil! “Lucite” is really just a trade mark for acrylic glass, which is not actually glass but a polymer synthesized from oil. To manufacture 1 kg of Lucite/acrylic glass you need more than 2 kg of oil, and then loads of energy. So once again a product featured on Gearnews is going backwards in terms of environmental impact: from using fibreboard which usually is made from scrap wood chips as a byproduct of cutting wood grown on plantations, this “Lucite” case here is… Read more »