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Luke Sean Edisyn

Luke Sean Edisyn  ·  Source: Luke Sean

Edisyn is Open Source and free to download and offers software MIDI control over a large range of synths with dozens of templates and room to build your own.

Edisyn

Librarian synth editors are one of the most useful tools for people who prefer their sounds in hardware but sequence and edit in software. It makes automation a breeze, lets you save patches within DAW projects and brings you best of both hardware and software worlds. Edisyn from developer Sean Luke is one such synthesizer editor that will give you control over a whole bunch of synths via custom made MIDI editing synthesizer templates.

Currently, Edisyn supports:

  • Alesis D4 and DM5
  • Casio CZ Series (CZ101, CZ1000, CZ3000, CZ5000, CZ-1, CZ-230S)
  • DSI Prophet ’08, Tetra, Mopho, Mopho Keyboard, Mopho SE, and Mopho x4 (Single and (for Tetra) Combo modes)
  • E-Mu Morpheus and Ultraproteus (Single, Hyperpreset, and MidiMap modes)
  • E-Mu Proteus 1, 1XR, 2, 2XR, 3, 3XR, and 1+Orchestral
  • Kawai K1, Kawai K1m, and Kawai K1r (Single and Multi Modes)
  • Kawai K4 and Kawai K4r (Single, Multi, Drum, and Effect Modes)
  • Kawai K5 and K5m (Single and Multi Modes, plus single-cycle wave uploading)
  • Korg SG Rack (Single and Multi Modes) and Korg SG Pro X
  • Korg MicroKorg (Single and Vocoder Modes)
  • Korg Microsampler
  • Korg Wavestation SR (Performance, Patch, and Wave Sequence Modes)
  • M-Audio Venom (Single, Multi, Arpeggiator, and Global Modes)
  • Novation Drumstation and D Station
  • Novation ReMOTE SL, SL MKII, and SL Compact Series
  • Oberheim Matrix 6, 6R, and 1000 (Single and (for 1000) Global Modes)
  • PreenFM2
  • Red Sound DarkStar and DarkStar XP2
  • Roland D-110 (Tone and Multi Modes)
  • Roland JV-80 and JV-880 (Single and Multi Modes)
  • Waldorf Blofeld and Waldorf Blofeld Keyboard (Single and Multi Modes, plus Wavetable uploading)
  • Waldorf Kyra (Single and Multi Modes)
  • Waldorf Microwave II, XT, and XTk (Single and Multi Modes)
  • Waldorf Rocket
  • Yamaha DX7 Family (DX7, TX7, TX802, TX216/TX816, Korg Volca FM, Dexed, DX200, DX9)
  • Yamaha 4-Op FM Family (DX21, DX27, DX100, TX81Z, DX11, TQ5, YS100, YS200, B200, V50, etc.) (Single and (for TX81Z and DX11) Multi Modes)
  • Yamaha FB01 (Single and Multi Modes)
  • Yamaha FS1R (Voice, Performance, and Fseq Modes)
  • Yamaha TG33, SY22, and SY35 (Single and (for TG33) Multi Modes)
  • General CC, NRPN, and RPN editing
  • Microtuning editing

There’s a lot of old favourites in there. It also has unlimited levels of undo, CC and NRPN mapping, real-time updates, test notes and chords and some MPE support.

Sean has also built in a range of creative tools to help with patch generation. These include randomisation, patch merging and blending of random patches, pushing patches closer towards other patches (very interesting), morphing interpolation between four patches and more.

Edisyn is not particularly exciting to look at and they’ve gone for functionality over style and flair but if you have any of these synths then it could be a really useful utility. Or, if you’ve ever fancied building an editor for one of your MIDI synths then now is your chance.

More information

  • Edisyn Github page.

3 responses to “Edisyn: Synth Patch Editor covers over 60 synthesizers for free”

  1. Missing, as yet says:

    Good anyway, but it would be nice in VST format. Been looking for years for a generic (multi DAW), controller VST where you can photograph your synth, load the jpeg into an editor, then add knobs and sliders over the top which control the MIDI functions on your synth. If it also had a 128 step sequencer with 5 controller lanes and 32 sequencer presets, that’d be perfect. If such a program existed, there’d be a template for every known MIDI device within 12 months. A sort of MaxForLive with a simple editor, a jpeg background that’s VST and works on any platform!

    • Sean Luke says:

      I’m Edisyn’s author. There is exactly what you’re looking for: CTRLR. Though I think you’re seriously underestimating the difficulty of making a patch editor.

      Anyway, Edisyn can’t be a VST because it’s a sophisticated multiwindow, menued, Java app which relies on a lot of functionality that VST subsystem can’t provide. But you CAN hook Edisyn up to a DAW and route signals to it to send to a remote synth. It does this quite well, actually. See Edisyn’s manual.

      • Missing as yet says:

        Thank you Sean, I realise it wouldn’t be easy to make such an editor which is why a simple to use one doesn’t already exist as VST. I’ve got Ctrlr, it’s great, but it’s not the easiest program to make new templates with. Your program is very good, and I understand that Java is a completely different proposition to a VST. I was trying to make the point that there is a space in the market for a simple to use VST editor that has a library of different knobs and sliders that you could quickly drop on a background JPG and assign a controller number to it. Max for Live does that job but isn’t easy to use either, and is used with Ableton only. Your program does that job well, though I realise it’s not a simple case of just porting it to VST. Thanks again for the program, it’s a good idea

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