by Lasse Eilers | 3,9 / 5,0 | Approximate reading time: 3 Minutes
Strymon BigSky Plugin

Strymon BigSky Plugin  ·  Source: Strymon

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Strymon has released the BigSky Plugin! This means that you can now indulge in the pedal’s famously lush and shimmering reverbs right inside your DAW – something that producers the world over have been hoping for for a long time.

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Strymon BigSky Plugin

The Strymon BigSky is easily one of the most popular digital reverb pedals out there – so popular, in fact, that it’s often used as a hardware effect in a studio setting. Producers all around the world cherish its huge palette of lush, dense, and shimmering reverbs just as much as guitarists, and many wished for a more convenient way to access them than running a signal from the DAW through a pedal and back again. Well, that day has finally arrived!

The Strymon BigSky Plugin brings the pedal’s twelve distinct reverb machines to your DAW. You can choose from more traditional engines like Room, Hall, Plate, or Spring, or take your sound to outer space with the aptly named Swell, Bloom, Cloud, or Shimmer algorithms. For more experimental sounds, choose the Non-Linear or Magneto settings.

Strymon BigSky Plugin

BigSky Plugin

Engine-specific controls

Given the fact that BigSky was originally designed as a pedal, its controls are delightfully simple, while still offering plenty of shaping options. The plugin has the same Decay, Pre-Delay, Tone, Mix, and Mod knobs also found on the pedal, which are always available regardless of the algorithm.

Below these knobs is an area that changes depending on which of the 12 engines you choose. This makes the algorithm-specific parameters much more visible and accessible compared to the pedal’s two assignable parameter knobs. And needless to say, the Big Sky Plugin also offers the pedal’s Infinite Sustain and Freeze modes, accessible via a switch and button.

While the BigSky pedal has been around for a while, its arrival as a plugin is great news indeed! If it sounds anything like the pedal, there’s a good chance that this could be one of the most exciting new reverb plugins of the year.

Strymon BigSky Plugin

BigSky offers 12 distinct reverb engines

Price and compatibility

The Strymon BigSky Plugin is now available at Thomann* for €239. Not cheap, but certainly much less expensive than the pedal! You can try it for free for seven days.

Strymon Big Sky Plugin

The BigSky Plugin runs on macOS Monterey or Big Sur (including native support for Apple Silicon Processors) and Windows 10. It’s available in AU, AAX, and VST3 formats. You’ll need a free iLok account for activation.

And if you prefer the original pedal version, you can get it from Thomann* for €499.

Strymon Big Sky

Strymon Big Sky

Customer rating:
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More information about the Strymon BigSky Plugin

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Image Sources:
  • BigSky Plugin: Strymon
  • BigSky offers 12 distinct reverb engines: Strymon
  • Strymon BigSky Plugin: Strymon
Strymon BigSky Plugin

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9 responses to “Strymon BigSky Plugin: the famous reverb pedal in your DAW!”

    mrsex says:
    6

    Good to see they are applying their absurd prices on their software too…

    AF says:
    3

    200? What a joke.

    Bob says:
    2

    Yikes!!! That’s a some big price they’re asking. There are so many great reverbs out there you’d think that Strymon would offer a competitive price for their first entry into this saturation marketplace. Frankly, I didn’t hear anything too different from many of the reverb plugins I already own so I’ll have to pass on this one.

    Ab. says:
    2

    Most hi-end software reverb costs more than 200$ (and up to 600$ for altiverb… but it’s a bit different)

    News flash : making softwares costs money, skilled programmers are expensive.

      Humberto says:
      0

      Valhalla VV $50 is a high end reverb plugin.

        Word to the Turtle says:
        2

        VV is a great plugin but only does a fraction of what the BigSky does.

        How much does it cost you to buy Valhalla Plate, Shimmer, Room, and Vintage Verb all together?

        Why is this so hard for everyone?

      Nron says:
      1

      wow, I had no idea the hardware units were analog. I thought those were running the software for years.

        The Great Zarnos says:
        0

        This exactly. The software has been written for years, so when you hear “developing software is hard,” ignore it.

    Robin says:
    1

    I cannot deny, I have been hoping for this plugin for a long time. However, I does not live up to my expectations, especially not for £200. Eventide Blackhole and/or Valhalla Supermassive are just as good for guitar and I don’t think it adds any magic to synth either? I also had problems feeding heavily compressed guitar into it, gave an explosive white noise with Studio One, needs more work I think. Make it better and more reliable for a £100 and I may consider it.

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